Letters to the Editor for Aug. 23, 2011

Evergreen Terrace residents are proud of their neighborhood

Twenty years ago, we purchased our home in the Evergreen Terrace Neighborhood. At that time, we were informed that this was a neighborhood “in transition.”

Most of the people were an older demographic, and having two small children and one on the way, we were among the youngest on our street.

At that time, the neighborhood was dotted with rentals. The house across the street was partially burned out and abandoned. And the high school girls next door had blow-out parties every time their mom left town.

Since that time, the neighborhood has definitely changed. The abandoned house was renovated. The rentals were purchased by homeowners. And other young couples began to move in, populating the sidewalks with small children and beloved family dogs. Yes, we transitioned, for the better!

We who live here consider Evergreen Terrace a unique place. In some ways, it’s a little like going back in time. How many people know the names of their neighbors two blocks and three doors down? How many know that Terry, the dog that lives at the end of the street, wandered too far from home, and needs a hand? How many of you know whose door to knock on if you have a medical emergency? Which of you has neighbors that you can call on at any time, to help fix a car, chain saw a downed tree in a storm, or just sit with and visit? We do!

We may not have the biggest, fanciest homes in Camas. We may not be wealthy, or live with lake views. But we are proud of our homes, and do not consider ourselves second-class citizens in any respect. To imply that our opinion does not matter because our houses are older is a class-based argument, which is wholly without merit. To hear people refer to our neighborhood as a “ghetto,” and our homes as “sugar shacks” is unconscionable.

I never thought of the Farrell House as a place with special status. I always regarded it as the place where our neighbors, The Farrells, lived. To treat us in such a demeaning manner has only made a strong neighborhood even stronger.

Sandra M. Alex, Camas

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