Camas Days spectacular

Young and old alike enjoy the festivities

A string of classic cars from the Flying Eagle As Model A Ford Car Club delighted the crowd at the Grand Parade.

Young and old alike enjoy the festivities

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These kids got into the spirit of things by wearing sunglasses with eyeballs on them and green body paint for the Kids Parade on Friday.

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The Camas-Washougal Fire Department’s 1928 American LaFrance fire engine experienced some engine trouble on Saturday. After breaking down on the parade route, the fire engine had to be pushed to a side street by members of the City Council and Fire Chief Nick Swinhart.

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The Camas High School Class of 1968 got into the spirit of the occasion.

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Ronald McDonald made an appearance at the Grand Parade. Many spectators were treated to coupons for a free ice cream cone at McDonald’s.

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Grand Parade spectators pet one of the dogs that can be adopted from the West Columbia Gorge Humane Society in Washougal.

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A youngster climbs the rock wall at Camas Days Kids Street.

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Families enjoyed scrambled eggs, sausages and blueberry pancakes Saturday, at Camas United Methodist Church.

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Camas Mayor Scott Higgins and his wife, Allison, toss candy to the crowd during the Grand Parade.

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Pam and Jim Clark, of Washougal, were the guests of honor at Saturday’s Camas Days Senior Royalty Luncheon at Zion Lutheran Church. The couple was recognized for their volunteer efforts in the local community. The event is organized by the C-W chapter of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs.

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Ken Marple, of Camas, looks at one of the airplanes on display Sunday, during an aviation event at Grove Field Airport, in Fern Prairie. In addition to cheeseburger lunches, T-shirts and airplane rides to benefit the Camas-Washougal Aviation Association scholarship fund, the event included information about local flight training opportunities.

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Bike and sports helmets were available to purchase Sunday at the East County Fire and Rescue open house. The event, held at the Fern Prairie station, also included blood pressure checks and a bouncy house, as well as opportunities to try on child-sized firefighter turnouts, put out a simulated house fire and climb aboard a Life Flight helicopter.

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The Camas Days Grand Parade officially got underway with the firing of the cannon.

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A Camas School District bus was turned into a rocket ship for Saturday’s Grand Parade. Students waved out the windows as the vehicle made its way down Northeast Fourth Avenue.

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Tanya Groth steers, and Robert Melton and Greg Irwin push, the Bathtub Bandits to victory at the Camas Days Bathtub Races Saturday. The trio won this event for the fourth year in a row.

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More than 125 vendors lined the streets of downtown during Camas Days last weekend. Items ranged from yard and garden trinkets to airbrush tattoos, to clothing items.

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Pat Ray helps gets the bathtub races started on Saturday, in front of the Camas Public Library. According to C-W Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Brent Erickson, Ray moved from Camas to Sacramento, Calif., 17 years ago. He returns to Camas each year to volunteer his help with the festival — from setup and staging to managing the Wine and Microbrew Street. “He’s my right-hand man,” Erickson said.

Whether it was the Grand Parade, the Kids Parade or all the activities in between, Camas Days was once again a crowd pleaser. The fun kicked off Friday with the annual Kids Parade. Children dressed in all matter of things “Outta This World” flooded the streets with smiles and tossed candy to eager onlookers.

The Camas Days theme gave young ones full use for their imaginations. It was organized by Camas Parks and Recreation, which gave each participant a pair of unique sunglasses and a ribbon.

Parade participants ranged from community groups to the Camas Public Library to families out enjoying the day.

Erin Waller of Camas came with her three children, who dressed as martians in green body paint and eyeball sunglasses.

“This is our first year in the Kids Parade and we’re excited,” she said. “We just love the big parade.”

Added Brittany Bradford, “We love the community involvement at this event, the food and the feel of nostalgia.”

Jones Waller, 10, enjoys seeing the costumes and floats in the Grand Parade.

“And the candy,” he said. “I love the candy.”

His sister, Olivia, 7, enjoys the Kids Street bounce houses.

“Those are lots of fun,” she said. “And so is the Kids Parade.”

Winners at the Kids Parade were Amanda Livingston (first-place) and Sophia Bledsoe (second-place) for individual costumes; the Samples family (first-place), the Dolin’s family (second-place), Space Pirates (third-place) and Captain Rex (honorable mention) for non-motorized floats, bikes and wagons; and JDZ Summer Camp, Area 51 (first-place), C-W Parent Co-op Preschool (second-place) and MOMS Club of Camas (third-place) for group costumes.

Bailley Simms, of Vancouver, has been attending Camas Days since she was 7.

“We love the Ducky Derby the most,” she said. “I keep hoping one year I will win it.”

The Ducky Derby is the Camas-Washougal Rotary’s Club biggest fund-raiser. Nearly 5,000 rubber ducks were tossed into the Washougal River on Sunday. The “fastest” ducks won prizes for those who have “adopted” them. The ducks were $5 to adopt.

“My mom keeps thinking one day she will win the grand prize,” Simms said.

This year, it is a trip to Hawaii.

Even if Simms doesn’t win, she loves the festival due to the atmosphere.

“Everyone always seems so happy and relaxed,” she said. “And it’s something fun to do in the summer. Everyone can come and have fun, no matter what your age.”

Rebecca Trimble, owner of Rebecca’s Collections, was participating in the festival as a first-time vendor. She has lived in the area for 20 years.

“It was the first year we weren’t out of town so I decided to do it,” she said.

Trimble, of Washougal, teaches wine and painting classes, which include all supplies, for $30 per person. She also creates murals and does other commissioned work.

“So far, I know everyone down here,” she said of her Camas Days experience. “There are no strangers.”