Seizing opportunities with legalized marijuana

License applicants vary from future law school student to current business owners

C-W marijuana license applicants

Retail:

Behind the Green Door, 1601 N.W. Sixth Ave., Camas

Bella Flora, 20111 S.E. 20th St., Camas; and 3140 Evergreen Way, Washougal

Elkgard Enterprises, 3419 S.E. Second Ave., Camas

Green Genes LLC, 3505 S.E. Washougal River Road, Washougal; and 319 N.E. Lechner St., Camas

House of Herb, 915 S.E. 201st Ct., Camas

JMSP, 3191 Evergreen Way, Washougal

Mary Jane’s 502, Inc., 325 N.E. Lechner St., Camas; and 245 Sixth St., Washougal

Mary Jane’s Garden, Inc., 245 Sixth St., Washougal

Munchies, 3520 N.E. Third Ave., Camas

New Vansterdam, 5716 N.W. El Rey Drive, Camas

P. Surjit, 501 N.E. Third Ave., Camas

Robert John Flatt, 2115 S.E. 192nd Ave., Unit 110

Production:

Alderhill Organics, 3213 N.E. 357th Ct., Washougal

Bacons Buds, 181 Katies Lane, Washougal

E Buds, 3321 G St., Washougal

Fourty Year Bud, 35151 N.E. Ammeter Road, #A, Washougal

Green Lily, 30822 N.E. Stauffer Road, Camas

Kim Sue Glass Works, Ellie Way, Washougal

Best Quality Gardens, 1401 Mathews Road, Washougal

Crop Circle Co., 207 N.E. 408th Ct., Washougal

Custom Cultivators, 2990 Evergreen Way, Washougal

Macs Roadside Service and Repair, 1020 S.E. Coffey Road, Washougal

Mt. Norway Farms, 2535 S.E. 362nd Ave., Ste. B, Washougal

Pure Production and Processing, 1506 S.E. Coffey Road, Ste. A, Washougal

Agrijuana, 4600 N.W. Camas Meadows Drive, Ste. 200, Camas

Aromatica Botanical, 36701 S.E. 20th St., Ste. A, Washougal

Aromatica Botanical, 36701 S.E. 20th St., Ste. B, Washougal

Carol’s Country Store, 4313 N.W. Sierra St., Ste. A, Camas

Carol’s Country Store, 2129 N.W. 43rd Ave., Ste. A, Camas

Praxis Holdings, 19215 S.E. 34th St., Ste. 106-2424, Camas

Skye High, 72 Barbara Lane, Washougal

Wolf Marijuana, 4806 N.E. 316th Ct., Camas

Processing:

Aromatica Botanical, 36701 S.E. 20th St., Ste. A, Washougal

Aromatica Botanical, 36701 S.E. 20th St., Ste. B, Washougal

Bacons Buds, 181 Katies Lane, Washougal

Best Quality Gardens, 1401 Mathews Road, Washougal

Carol’s Country Store, 4313 N.W. Sierra St., Ste. A, Camas

Crop Circle Co., 207 N.E. 408th Ct., Washougal

Custom Cultivators, 2990 Evergreen Way, Washougal

Green Lily, 30822 N.E. Stauffer Road, Camas

Kim Sue Glass Works, Ellie Way, Washougal

Macs Roadside Service and Repair, 1020 S.E. Coffey Road, Washougal

Mt. Norway Farms, 2535 S.E. 362nd Ave., Ste. B, Washougal

Pure Production and Processing, 1506 S.E. Coffey Road, Ste. A, Washougal

Skye High, 72 Barbara Lane, Washougal

Wolf Marijuana, 4806 N.E. 316th Ct., Camas

A variety of local residents are hoping to grow, process or sell marijuana in a retail setting.

Christopher Lauer, 21, of Camas, is among the individuals who have applied for a retail marijuana sales license through the Washington State Liquor Control Board.

“I’d like to open a shop, support myself and get through college,” he said.

Lauer, a 2010 Camas High School graduate, has an associate’s degree from Clark College. He is hoping to continue his education, earn a bachelor’s degree in business and eventually attend law school.

His application for a license for Green Leaf Enterprise LLC lists 3520 N.E. Third Ave., Camas, as a potential site of “Munchies.”

“If someone’s going to be able to sell, why not let someone who has a reason and would like to support higher education,” Lauer said.

The application included a fee of $250.

Information about local marijuana license applicants was obtained through a public records request from the Post-Record to the State Liquor Control Board.

Ken Kakuk, 53, of Camas, prepared marijuana production (tier three) and processing license applications.

The paperwork, filed under the business name of Carol’s Country Store LLC, lists Kakuk, his wife Carol and their son Adam as members of the corporation.

The business location addresses are listed as 2129 N.W. 43rd Ave., and 4313 N.W. Sierra St., Ste. A, both in Camas.

A tier one designation would involve a “plant canopy” of less than 2,000 square feet at the production premises. Tier two would apply to plant canopies of 2,000 to 10,000 square feet, and tier three would involve canopies of 10,000 to 30,000 square feet.

“We would grow a crop, and that’s it,” Kakuk said. “It looks like it would be more profitable than growing squash and tomatoes.”

The applications included $500 in fees.

Kakuk was a candidate for the Camas City Council Position 2, Ward 2 seat in November 2013, and he ran for mayor in 2011.

The State Department of Revenue has been accepting marijuana business license applications on the state Liquor Control Board’s behalf.

According to Gordy Euler, with Clark County Community Planning, the county has been allotted 15 retail marijuana licenses. That includes six for the unincorporated county, six for Vancouver, and one each for Camas, Washougal and Battle Ground.

Liquor Control Board staff are developing guidelines for a retail license lottery, since there are more applicants than available licenses.

Euler said there are no limits in state law on the number of marijuana producers, but there is a limit of two million square feet statewide that can be designated for marijuana plant canopy. There are no limits in state law on the number of processors.

It will be at least five months before retail businesses in Washougal can consider selling marijuana, if they are approved by the Washington State Department of Revenue.

The Washougal City Council approved an emergency ordinance on Dec. 2, regarding the establishment of retail businesses that sell marijuana.

It established a moratorium prohibiting all uses allowed under state Initiative 502. The Camas City Council approved an emergency moratorium on Nov. 4, for all I-502-related uses until April 14, 2014.

In 2012, Washington voters approved I-502. It allows individuals 21 and older to possess and use marijuana-related paraphernalia and any combination of one ounce of usable marijuana, 16 ounces of marijuana infused product in solid form or 72 ounces of marijuana infused product in liquid form.

Individuals are subject to criminal prosecution for possession in amounts greater than that or possession of any quantity or kind by a person younger than 21.

New marijuana licenses cannot be issued to businesses located within 1,000 feet of the perimeter of elementary or secondary schools, playgrounds, recreation centers or facilities, childcare centers, public parks and transit centers, libraries and game arcades.

David MacArthur has applied for licenses to produce (tier two) and process marijuana.

MacArthur Enterprises LLC is located at 1020 S.E. Coffey Road, Washougal.

MacArthur said he would like to “take advantage of a money making opportunity.”

“If everything goes through and I get a license, I would put up a pole barn,” he said. “It would be closed in and sealed up.”

Some of the local applicants expressed apprehension about being identified before they are potentially granted licenses.

“I was told not to talk to the media just yet,” said a man who requested anonymity after filing an application and paying $250 for the chance to sell marijuana and marijuana-infused products in a retail setting in Camas. “We’ve been in business for many years in Clark County. Being in a regulated situation is better than having street drugs.

“We have a very strong record selling alcohol and tobacco,” he added. “We feel this is an opportunity to make sure stuff is sold properly and done the right way.”An applicant for producing (tier one) and processing marijuana in Washougal said she was not comfortable with having her name released.

“It is not socially acceptable or politically correct,” she said regarding marijuana.

A business owner is concerned that information about his application to become a marijuana retailer in Camas would affect his current operation.

“As long as the state has approved it, it’s just like any other business as long as you follow the rules,” he said.

“Some people will be against it, some will be for it,” the man added. “You can’t make everyone happy. Why not give it a try?”

Another applicant for a retail license to sell marijuana and marijuana paraphernalia in Camas said the process of acquiring a license is comparable to a modern day gold rush.

“It’s a totally new industry that is starting from the ground up for all intent and purposes, a land grab if you will,” he said. “Clearly it doesn’t take a genius to realize the potential gains that may reward early adopters, and it would be foolish for anyone to deny that motive.

His application lists several of his friends as corporate officers.

“The founders live in Clark County, work in Clark County and have kids that we plan on raising in Clark County in the future,” he said. “Each of us has also had the opportunity to live in cities that have been ruined and tainted with the stigma of drugs.

“The prospect of a new legal high is unprecedented and uncharted,” the man added. “As with any industry, [this company] is striving to become a viable, respectable, and, of course, successful tax paying business.”

A Washougal resident who has paid $500 to submit applications as a prospective marijuana producer (tier two) and processor is frustrated with Clark County leaders and the creation of zones where processing, producing and retailing could take place.

“This puts most of us out of the growing zones,” he said. “We are all spending time and money applying for the licenses. We have plans for buildings and equipment and no place to set them up and no assurance that we will be able to use them, based on the zones that are currently in place.

“What good is a license, when issued, if you can’t use it”” he added. “Most of us are on hold.”

The Clark County Commissioners will hold a work session Wednesday, Jan. 8, at 10 a.m., in the training room on the sixth floor of the Clark County Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St., Vancouver.

“We are asking for direction from the board as to their preferences for where to site the three types of marijuana facilities,” Euler said.

The county commissioners’ discussions affect potential licensees outside of city limits.

The work session, which will be open to the public, will feature discussions between the board and county staff. It will not be a formal opportunity for public comment or testimony.