Interim county administrator begins work on Sept. 11

Mark McCauley has worked in county government since 2001

Mark McCauley has worked in county government since 2001

Send-off for retiring county administrator is Thursday

An open house will celebrate more than four decades of public service by outgoing County Administrator Bill Barron from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 5.

The event will be held at the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St. Presentations will begin at 3:30 p.m.

Barron began his career in public administration in Lake County, Ill., in 1972, following active duty in the U.S. Air Force. He became county administrator for McHenry County, Ill., in 1994.

The Board of County Commissioners hired Barron in 1998 to become chief administrative officer for Clark County.

Barron plans to retire Sept. 10.

A farewell interview with Barron is airing on CVTV-23 through September. It can be found at www.clark.wa.gov/...>

For more information about the open house, call (360) 397-6012 or email pio@clark.wa.gov.

Clark County’s interim county administrator will begin his new job on Sept. 11.

Mark McCauley, who is currently the county’s general services director, will step in for retiring County Administrator Bill Barron.

A certified public accountant, McCauley started working for Clark County as public works finance manager in 2001. A Ridgefield resident, he was promoted to general services director in 2006. Earlier, he had served in the U.S. Army for 20 years, where he achieved the rank of lieutenant colonel.

“Mark is well-respected and qualified to guide Clark County,” said Clark County Commission Chairman Steve Stuart. “This is a strong organization that will be well served by Mark’s knowledge and expertise.”

The Board of Clark County Commissioners agreed to select an interim chief administrative officer while 15 freeholders, who will be elected in November, draft a home rule charter for voters to consider. A draft charter could preserve the existing appointed administrator position or propose replacing it with an elected county executive position.

Barron is retiring after a 14-year career with Clark County.