Candidate Profiles: U.S. Representative Third Congressional District

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Jon T. Haugen

Jon T. Haugen

Address: 13502 N.W. 49th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98685

Phone: (360) 907-8340

E-mail: Jon@HaugenVet.com

Age: 53

Occupation: Retired Navy Pilot

Education: United States Naval Academy, graduated 1981, top-third of the class

Political Party: Democrat

Web site: www.Haugen Vet.com

1. What are the top three issues Congress should be focused on when it convenes in January 2013?

1 - Jobs: Infrastructure like new bridges, manufacturing jobs and construction jobs, penalize companies that move jobs to China, India, Mexico, etc. and reward companies that create jobs here. 2. Pass Simpson-Bowles budget plan to strengthen and protect Social Security and Medicare; 3. Reduce the debt by growing the economy, less spending and more revenue.

2. How does your background help you be an advocate for Southwest Washington at the national level, with all of the issues it faces?

I served 24 years as member United States Military, I was a Navy pilot. I learned to work with others to solve problems. I will bring that common sense approach to solve the challenges we face.

3. As an elected official or activist, what has been your best contribution in the past?

I got into politics to fight for education. I was the only private citizen to testify before both House and Senate committees in support of simple majority. I then traveled around the state to restore democracy to the school levy ballot.

4. Congress currently has one of the lowest public approval ratings in its history. What can/should the new Congress do to be more effective and to improve that public perception?

Replace the incumbents like Congresswoman Herrera Beutler. Compromise is not a four-letter word. Congresswoman Herrera Beutler has sworn a pledge to former lobbyist Grover Norquist to never raise taxes on rich people. My only pledge is to our nation, the same pledge I made as an 18 year old when I joined the United States Military. I ask for your vote.

5. What was the finest accomplishment of the last Congress during the past two years? What was its biggest failure?

Accomplishment: Transportation bill, but 12 months late.

Failures: Downgrade of nation’s credit rating; failure to pass a jobs bill; failure to end the war in Afghanistan where our brave service members die and we spend $2 billion per week.

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Jaime Herrera Beutler

Jaime Herrera Beutler

Address: P.O. Box 1614, Ridgefield, WA 98642

Phone: (360) 597-3065

E-mail: info@votejaime.com

Age: 33

Occupation: U.S. Representative for Southwest Washington

Education: University of Washington, bachelor’s degree in communications

Political Party: Republican

Website: www.votejaime.com

1. What are the top three issues Congress should be focused on when it convenes in January 2013?

Jobs: More than one in 10 moms and dads in Southwest Washington are out of work, and creating jobs must remain our focus. I’ve made “jobs” my mission since day one. My Forest Roads bill helped protect 120,000 forest-industry jobs in Washington when the President signed a one-year version into law. Earlier this year, I helped write the first bipartisan transportation bill in 7 years that will fund transportation projects and create jobs across our nation. By working in a bipartisan fashion, we’ll continue passing substantial legislation that puts more folks back to work.

Saving taxpayer money: For decades, both political parties overspent taxpayer money and created our crushing $16 trillion national debt. I’ve fought to save taxpayer money wherever possible. For instance, I introduced a bill to cut my own salary, and the salaries of every other member of Congress, by 10 percent. We must put our budget on a sustainable path.

Ensuring a highly skilled workforce: We must make sure our children are prepared to compete in the 21st century economy. By strengthening science, technology, engineering and math curriculum in our schools, and paving the way for skilled training opportunities, we’ll make sure we have a well-prepared workforce.

2. How does your background help you be an advocate for Southwest Washington at the national level, with all of the issues it faces?

From day one as Southwest Washington’s U.S. Representative, serving our region has remained my mission. I grew up here, and had the privilege of serving Clark County in the state House of Representatives. In that time, I’ve listened to citizens and learned what matters to folks here. I’ve stood up to both political parties — including my own, when necessary — to put the needs of families and communities here first. Too many moms and dads don’t have jobs, and I’ve made a steadfast commitment to turning this economy around. No one will work harder for the folks here than I will.

3. As an elected official or activist, what has been your best contribution in the past year?

As this region’s federal representative, in the last year I have kept my focus on jobs. From holding a jobs fair in Clark County for 850 job seekers, to crafting a bipartisan bill that will strengthen opportunities for more than 900 small contracting businesses in our region. I’ve never taken my eyes off of our need for economic recovery. Families and individuals here are struggling with gas prices that are too high, a difficult housing market, and a recovering economy. I will strengthen my resolve to fight for jobs, if reelected.

4. Congress currently has one of the lowest public approval ratings in its history. What can/should the new Congress do to be more effective and to improve that public perception?

I share frustration over the dysfunction in Congress. I didn’t run for this position to join partisan warfare back in Washington, DC. I ran to help fix the big problems facing our nation.

For decades, both political parties overspent taxpayer money and added to the deficit. Now, we must address our crushing $16 trillion national debt. Difficult decisions are necessary. Career politicians are resistant to changing the old way of doing business, but the “old way” got us into the mess we face today. I’m committed to wiser spending of your tax dollars and bringing more transparency and accountability to the process.

5. What was the finest accomplishment of the last Congress during the past two years? What was its biggest failure?

In the last two years, this Congress has changed the national conversation on spending. It went from “How do we spend our way out of recession?” with failed stimulus bills and bailouts, to “How can we begin saving taxpayer money?”

That’s a critical and necessary start to tackle our debt. If we don’t, we’ll burden our children and grandchildren with so much debt, that prosperity and the American dream will drift out of reach for most folks.

Congress has not done enough to bridge the divide between parties and produce results. It was both Republicans and Democrats who overspent the national credit card and put our country in this difficult position. Now, both parties must come together around bipartisan solutions to address our problems. I’m proud to have played a part in what we’ve accomplished: A transportation bill, a forest-economy initiative, a strong protection against insider trading in Congress, but much more needs to be done.

Southwest Washington expects its federal representative to work independently to solve problems. Whether its balancing our budget or focusing on job creation, I’ll work with people who share these goals to produce results.

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