Hometown

Washougal shows patriotic Pomp and Circumstance

The Washougal High School graduation ceremony Saturday included several opportunities to honor America and the veterans and students willing to defend it. Members of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Schick-Ogle Post 4278 installed a new flag at the school, as the soon-to-be graduates who had enlisted to serve in the various branches of the military stood in front of the commencement stage. VFW Officer of the Day Gary Andreas played "To the Color" on a ceremonial bugle as the flag was raised, and the WHS band performed the "Star Spangled Banner," during the salute. The ceremony got underway at Fishback Stadium with the school band performing the traditional "Pomp and Circumstance," as the seniors joyfully entered Fishback Stadium two by two, giving each other hugs, high fives and fist pumps. Family and friends brought bouquets of roses and orange balloons to the stands, and a beach ball made an appearance twice.

CHS class of 2013 celebrates its achievements

All four high schools in Camas and Washougal recently held their graduation ceremonies. Post-Record reporters were on hand to capture the special moments. Camas High School Cheers, tears and laughter could be heard throughout Doc Harris Stadium Friday night, where more than 500 proud Papermakers participated in commencement ceremonies. The class of 2013 is not only the largest class ever in school history, but it is also the first senior class to compete at the 4A level, and set a new record for scholarships, with approximately $9.3 million amassed.

Excelsior High School graduation

Excelsior High School Each of the graduates had a different story to about how they ended up at Excelsior High School. From pregnancy and struggles to keep up with school work to a lack of motivation and feeling lost in the shuffle, each of these situations could have led these students to make the decision to forego earning a high school diploma.

Outdoor school gives students the opportunity to discover more about the Columbia River Gorge and its history

Ask a sixth-grader what their favorite aspect of outdoor school is, and a likely response will be the opportunity to get out of the classroom. And that’s the point. Outdoor school, aligned with state science standards, is meant to give students a hands-on approach to the natural world they can't get by going online or looking at photos in a textbook. Students learn through inquiry and practical application by doing hands-on activities.

Several Camas School District employees are retiring after years in education

“You laugh, you cry and you work harder than you ever thought you could. “Some days, you're trying to change the world and some days you're just trying to make it through the day. “Your wallet is empty, your heart is full, and your mind is packed with memories of kids who have changed your life. “Just another day in the classroom." For most retiring teachers and administrators in Camas, this poem by Krissy Venosdale rings true in a number of ways. Some chose the field of education years ago and have spent a career immersed in it. For others, it was a second calling later in life. All of those interviewed couldn't imagine doing anything else.

Several Washougal School District employees retiring after years in education

“You laugh, you cry and you work harder than you ever thought you could. Some days, you're trying to change the world and some days you're just trying to make it through the day. Your wallet is empty, your heart is full, and your mind is packed with memories of kids who have changed your life. Just another day in the classroom." For many retiring teachers and administrators in Camas and Washougal, this poem by Krissy Venosdale rings true in a number of ways. Some chose the field of education years ago and have spent a career immersed in it. For others, it was a second calling later in life. In the May 28 and June 4 editions of the Post-Record, readers will find profiles of several notable retirees in the Camas and Washougal school districts who turned their love of teaching and learning into a career. Now, they are looking forward to the next stage. Up first are the Washougal educators, look for those from Camas next week.

Cycling through history

“I’m going to get paid to ride my bike!” That was the first thought when my editor suggested profiling local history rides for a feature article.Anyone who knows me well understands I have a passion for exercise, and I’m also intrigued by most anything historical. Anyone who knows me well understands I have a passion for exercise, and I'm also intrigued by most anything historical. Although I'm new to cycling, I was pretty certain I could keep up with the other riders on the 15 to 20 mile jaunt, which includes several stops to visit local areas of interest. The Camas History Stroll, as its called, is led by Joseph Blanco. Given the amount of information he knows about the area, you'd think he'd lived here for several years.

Cruising the country

Elton and Madeline Richardson shared a lot of memories in their 62 years of marriage: Raising a family, working in the state Capitol in Olympia, and delving into real estate were just a few.They also shared a passion for history and travel, which culminated in a two-year trip to see every state capitol in the continental United States. “I worked security in Olympia, and Madeline was a tour guide,” he said. “After being at the capitol, we decided it was a goal to visit all 48 of them.” The two also visited several historical sites, including all the battlefields of the Revolutionary and Civil wars. In addition, their tour included national parks and monuments, such as Niagara Falls, Yellowstone, Branson, Miss., the St. Louis Arch, Mount Rushmore, the Florida Everglades, Key West, space centers in Florida and Texas, the Statue of Liberty, the top of the World Trade Center and the Alamo, to name a few. Other highlights of the trip, which lasted from 1991 to 1993, included visiting the Connecticut state capitol and an unusual tour guide in Oklahoma. "They were remodeling the capitol there at the time, so there was no guided tour," he said. "So, we conducted our own. A gentleman came up and asked us what we were doing, and if we needed help. Then, he took us all around and gave us a great tour. Afterward, he introduced himself as a state senator. We had no idea."

In search of summer fun

Summer. It’s a time for kids to kick back, relax and enjoy themselves. There are several camps in Clark County that offer options to do that, ranging from a few hours to several days. Camps include everything from how to improve sports skills to how to improve outdoor skills. Best of all, there are choices for all ages, stages and price ranges.

Skamania Lodge opens new zip line tour

I am deathly afraid of heights. Until recently, even driving on winding roads with a drop-off was enough to nearly induce a panic attack. So it stands to reason that I would not be standing on a wobbly, though secure, wooden platform 22 feet off the ground, preparing to jump into mid-air. But here I am, with six other journalists from various publications in Southwest Washington. It's a fun group, with a few of the more experienced, “zippers” cracking jokes about past experiences.