Delavar, Lindsay are in the hunt for Washougal Council Position 4

Incumbent Michael Delavar faces Joyce Lindsay

MICHAEL DELAVAR

Education: Bachelor's degree in fine arts from the University of Colorado

Community involvement: Member of "Campaign for Liberty"

Phone: 771-4859

Email: Michael@michaeldelavar.com

Website: www.MichaelDelavar.com

JOYCE LINDSAY

Education: Attended University of Denver and University of Washington

Community involvement: Vice President of Columbia Gorge Women's Association, former co-chair of Camas-Washougal Rotary Club "Ducky Derby," former board member of Camas Performing Arts Series, participant in Walk 'n Knock and Santa's Posse

Phone: 335-1972

Email: joycelindsaywashougal@gmail.com

Website: www.JoyceLindsayforWashougal.com

MICHAEL DELAVAR

Education: Bachelor’s degree in fine arts from the University of Colorado

Community involvement: Member of “Campaign for Liberty”

Phone: 771-4859

Email: Michael@michaeldelavar.com

Website: www.MichaelDelavar.com

JOYCE LINDSAY

Education: Attended University of Denver and University of Washington

Community involvement: Vice President of Columbia Gorge Women’s Association, former co-chair of Camas-Washougal Rotary Club “Ducky Derby,” former board member of Camas Performing Arts Series, participant in Walk ‘n Knock and Santa’s Posse

Phone: 335-1972

Email: joycelindsaywashougal@gmail.com

Website: www.JoyceLindsayforWashougal.com

The issues of attracting jobs to and growing businesses in Washougal are among the topics of interest for the candidates in the Washougal City Council Position 4 race — Michael Delavar and Joyce Lindsay.

Delavar, the incumbent, listed encouraging job creation and job growth as one of his top issues — but not with government subsidies.

“If we provide the environment that is known for being business friendly, then we are going to be in a much better situation,” he said. “If a green job industry wants to come to Washougal, and they say it’s a great place for employees to live — situated near rail, the highway and a deep water port — if that is the reason they move there, then we will have some incredible businesses.”

Delavar likes to think in terms of not dictating what the free market will do.

“If we protect private property and private property rights, if we keep our fees and regulations as low as possible, I think the appropriate businesses that will be successful will find a way to us.” he said.

Lindsay appreciates the investments that Wes Hickey has made in downtown Washougal. They include the $13 million Washougal Town Square and an “incubator” building, which is expected to open next year.

The smaller structure could attract smaller businesses that want to test the local market with options to sign one year leases.

“I think that’s a very good concept he has,” Lindsay said. “Even with our flower business, the start up is hard. If you have to pay really high rent, they can’t generate enough money to get past the cost to keep them going and to grow.

“I assume it will take some of that risk out of starting a small business,” she added.

Lindsay, former co-owner of Lindsay’s Flowers, in Washougal, is retired.

She said she does not have any political ambitions.

“This is not a stepping stone for me,” Lindsay said. “Washougal is the bottom line.”

Delavar, a captain with Horizon Airlines, has served on City Council since June 2007.

“I want to continue to represent the people and protect, life, liberty and property,” he said.

Observers of council meetings can often hear Delavar saying, “I rise in opposition.”

“I want to provide a check against bureaucracy and maintain fiscal responsibility,” he said. “I want to protect reserves and not overextend ourselves.”

Lindsay, 72, said she would bring maturity and experience to the council.

“I work well with people,” she said. “The inner turmoil of council needs to be smoothed out or changed.”

Lindsay said government should be consensus building.

Delavar, 37, said the city’s sign codes need to be examined.

At issue is whether “monument signs,” instead of “lollipop signs” are appropriate for all businesses.

“Lollipop signs are visual clutter, but they capture attention of consumers for better business,” Delavar said. “Some business owners want that ability.”

Lindsay would like to see more community activities developed — such as concerts at Hathaway Park and urban gardening workshops.

They would involve finding private funding to fund the activities.

“This is above and beyond just keeping the city running — what the city is supposed to do — the infrastructure, the safety,” Lindsay said. “I believe in efficient government. I don’t believe necessarily in being frugal, because you can spend money and be very efficient about how you spend the money. I would not be a wild spender.”

Delavar’s campaign has raised $2,600, while Lindsay’s has raised $4,700.

Delavar has called the Washougal City Council’s $150,000 budget amendment to address the EMS shortfall “a short-term fix.”

“The issue is what level of service can we afford and what level of service are we willing to underwrite,” he said. “The council can allocate money from the general fund to bring EMS service levels to whatever level we want them to be.”

Lindsay said she is interested in watching how the trial consolidation of the WFD and CFD will work.

“It’s too early to tell,” she said.

Delavar said he models open government service by putting his voting record and statements on his website. He is also available to hear constituents’ concerns.

Lindsay was a political fund raiser and consultant for 15 years — for the campaigns of Washington Gov. Booth Gardner and Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell.

“I can think through a problem,” Lindsay said. “I can process information. I can project long-term thinking.”

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