Escape the heat in Camas and Washougal

Washougal offers cooling stations

Anyone can suffer from heat-related illness, but some people are at greater risk than others.

Clark County Health Department officials recommend regularly checking on infants and young children, people 65 or older and those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure. Visit at-risk adults at least twice a day and look for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Infants and young children need more frequent attention.

Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Warning signs of heat stroke include: body temperature above 103 degrees; red, hot and dry skin (no sweating); rapid, strong pulse; throbbing headache; nausea; dizziness; confusion; and loss of consciousness.

If any of these signs are visible, call for immediate medical assistance and begin cooling the victim. Place the victim in a tub of cool water or cool shower, or spray the person with cool water from a garden hose. Do not give the person fluids to drink.

Less severe heat related illnesses include heat exhaustion and heat cramps. Signs are heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, weakness, headache and vomiting. Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages. Seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last more than an hour.

With temperatures expected to reach 100 degrees during the next few days, there are several places to stay cool in Camas and Washougal.

Cooling stations will be available in Washougal at the municipal complex at 1701 “C” St.

Citizens can escape the heat at City Hall Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., or at the community center Monday through Thursday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Sunday from 2 to 6 p.m. In addition, the Washougal Community Library is open Tuesdays, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Wednesdays through Saturdays, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

In Camas, citizens can cool off inside the library, 625 N.E. Fourth Ave. The facility, which offers free wireless internet access, is open Monday through Wednesday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Thursday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Anyone can suffer from heat-related illness, but some people are at greater risk than others.

Clark County Health Department officials recommend regularly checking on infants and young children, people 65 or older and those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure. Visit at-risk adults at least twice a day and look for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Infants and young children need more frequent attention.

Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Warning signs of heat stroke include: body temperature above 103 degrees; red, hot and dry skin (no sweating); rapid, strong pulse; throbbing headache; nausea; dizziness; confusion; and loss of consciousness.

If any of these signs are visible, call for immediate medical assistance and begin cooling the victim. Place the victim in a tub of cool water or cool shower, or spray the person with cool water from a garden hose. Do not give the person fluids to drink.

Less severe heat related illnesses include heat exhaustion and heat cramps. Signs are heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, weakness, headache and vomiting. Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages. Seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last more than an hour.

The Camas Municipal Pool, 120 N.E. 17th Ave., will be open extended hours this weekend with an additional open swim on Sunday, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Regular open swim times occur Monday through Saturday from 2 to 3:30 p.m., and every day from 4 to 5:30 p.m. There are also evening open swims from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays. General admission for 13- to 59-year-olds is $4. Youth and senior citizens pay $3.

Air conditioned movie theaters and shopping malls, are also good options for those looking to spend some time indoors.

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning from noon Friday to 5 a.m. Sunday. Daytime high temperatures are expected to range from 90 to 100 degrees on Friday, and 95 to 100 on Saturday.

“This is abnormally early for a heat wave of this magnitude,” the warning reads. “Be sure to avoid exertion during the heat of the day, and to stay hydrated with clear liquids.”

Officials with the Clark County Public Health department urge people to protect themselves from heat.

“Heat-related problems are preventable,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County health officer. “We are encouraging people to avoid or limit physical activity outdoors, take shelter in air-conditioned buildings, and drink plenty of fluids. Elderly people and the very young are especially vulnerable during periods of intense or prolonged heat.”

Please review our community guidelines