Letters to the Editor for Sept. 23, 2014

Vick’s rubbery ethics

Recently, the newspapers noted an effort to reign in the relationship between Washington legislators and lobbyists. The committee started with a focus on “free” lunches. The limit suggested was 12. That would be once a week for three months or twice a month for six months, etc.

Speaking for myself, if you were to take me to lunch 12 times a year, I would love you. What makes our legislators harder to seduce?

At the time of the preliminary vote, our representative in the 18th Legislative District, Brandon Vick, could not make a decision on this without checking with his Republican mates.

Having consulted with his Republican mates, Vick then voted against the number 12. Now I wonder, how often does Vick think it takes for political seduction to take place? This guy is on the ethics committee.

My mom taught me ethics. I go to church to reinforce my ethics. Is knowing right from wrong a problem for Vick?

My mom would be embarrassed. Maybe Vick’s mom would be, too.

I intend to vote for Mike Briggs. He doesn’t need anyone to tell him what his ethics are and he has convinced me that he can make decisions that work for the betterment of our 18th District.

Marilyn Tyrrell, Washougal

Vote for Lauren

Lauren Colas and I audited together at a Fortune 100 company before the workplace became paperless.

I admired Lauren’s innate ability to be visionary. I recall how she created a detailed tracking system that allowed our auditing department to be much more efficient and streamlined. Later this system was incorporated into an electronic contracting, invoicing, auditing and payment system, now used worldwide.

I am certain that Lauren will approach her duties as county treasurer in the same manner — always looking for ways to improve, and finding cost savings and efficiencies in the process. Vote for Lauren.

Paula Q. Helinski, Mt. Vernon

Stonier has the skill and will

Rep. Paul Harris has courted the support of Washington teachers in his bid for re-election. However, his campaign is literally propping up the campaign of Lynda Wilson, fellow Republican candidate for the state house. If his signs are carrying her signs, he is carrying her message.

Wilson’s website message to teachers — and parents — is that Rep. Monica “Stonier’s experiences are extremely limited to education, having spent her entire adult life either going to school or working in schools. Even though education is very important, the role of a legislator demands broad life experiences.”

Wilson lists her education as graduating from a local high school as well as from a program in constitutional studies that a Google search won’t produce and another program that teaches Republican candidates how to run a campaign. Being an NRA instructor is listed under “professional” experience. This brings us to her chum, Rep. Liz Pike, whose main education initiative was to arm teachers.

Pike and Harris have failed the children of Clark County by not fighting to fully fund state schools before — or after — the state Supreme Court ruled the legislature has violated the state Constitution. Wilson’s view of educators’ capabilities as “extremely limited” reveals her lack of respect for public education. (Arguments that the court has no standing here show the danger of people attending claptrap constitutional institutes.)

Wilson’s “broad experience” is aligning herself with employers who use independent contractor status and other means to dodge decent obligations to employees. Teachers see society for what it is every day — both strengths and weaknesses.

If Wilson thinks teaching lacks leadership, view it this way: A teacher oversees project teams (students) of varying skills with constant accountability for dozens of customers (parents/administrators).

Stonier has the skill and the will to fight for working families and kids.

Jamie Hurly, Vancouver

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